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Tyler

The hottest new technologies are coming to cars in AI News

The hottest new technologies are coming to cars
3 May 2016, 12:00 am

                    FOSTER CITY, Calif. -- Ask tech industry observers to list the hottest new technologies and you're likely to hear a consistent chorus of artificial intelligence (AI), neural networks, 5G, Internet of Things (IoT) and mobility. Ask them where those technologies will have an impact, on the other hand, and the responses will likely be all over the map.

USA Today - Tech HeadlinesLink

Source: AI in the News

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Started Today at 11:00:06 AM
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Tyler

White House launches public workshops on AI issues in Robotics News

White House launches public workshops on AI issues
4 May 2016, 9:01 am

circuit_board_brain_neural_AI_machine_learning_DeepMind_Pong_Cooperation_competitionThe White House today announced a series of public workshops on artificial intelligence (AI) and the creation of an interagency working group to learn more about the benefits and risks of artificial intelligence. The first workshop Artificial Intelligence: Law and Policy will take place on May 24 at the University of Washington School of Law, cohosted by the White House and UW’s Tech Policy Lab. The event places leading artificial intelligence experts from academia and industry in conversation with government officials interested in developing a wise and effective policy framework for this increasingly important technology.

Speakers include:

The final workshop will be held on July 7th at the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts, New York. The Social and Economic Implications of Artificial Intelligence Technologies in the Near-Term will address the near-term impacts of AI technologies across social and economic systems. The event is hosted by the White House and New York University’s Information Law Institute, with support from Google Open Research and Microsoft Research.

The focus will be the challenges of the next 5-10 years, specifically addressing five themes: social inequality, labor, financial markets, healthcare, and ethics. Leaders from industry, academia, and civil society will share ideas for technical design, research and policy directions.

You can learn more about these events via the links to the event websites below, and each workshop will be livestreamed:

According to Ed Felton, Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer, “There is a lot of excitement about artificial intelligence (AI) and how to create computers capable of intelligent behavior. After years of steady but slow progress on making computers “smarter” at everyday tasks, a series of breakthroughs in the research community and industry have recently spurred momentum and investment in the development of this field.

Today’s AI is confined to narrow, specific tasks, and isn’t anything like the general, adaptable intelligence that humans exhibit. Despite this, AI’s influence on the world is growing. The rate of progress we have seen will have broad implications for fields ranging from healthcare to image- and voice-recognition. In healthcare, the President’s Precision Medicine Initiative and the Cancer Moonshot will rely on AI to find patterns in medical data and, ultimately, to help doctors diagnose diseases and suggest treatments to improve patient care and health outcomes.

In education, AI has the potential to help teachers customize instruction for each student’s needs. And, of course, AI plays a key role in self-driving vehicles, which have the potential to save thousands of lives, as well as in unmanned aircraft systems, which may transform global transportation, logistics systems, and countless industries over the coming decades.

Like any transformative technology, however, artificial intelligence carries some risk and presents complex policy challenges along several dimensions, from jobs and the economy to safety and regulatory questions. For example, AI will create new jobs while phasing out some old ones—magnifying the importance of programs like TechHire that are preparing our workforce with the skills to get ahead in today’s economy, and tomorrow’s. AI systems can also behave in surprising ways, and we’re increasingly relying on AI to advise decisions and operate physical and virtual machinery—adding to the challenge of predicting and controlling how complex technologies will behave.

There are tremendous opportunities and an array of considerations across the Federal Government in privacy, security, regulation, law, and research and development to be taken into account when effectively integrating this technology into both government and private-sector activities.

That is why the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy is excited to announce that we will be co-hosting four public workshops over the coming months on topics in AI to spur public dialogue on artificial intelligence and machine learning and identify challenges and opportunities related to this emerging technology. These four workshops will be co-hosted by academic and non-profit organizations, and two of them will also be co-hosted by the National Economic Council. These workshops will feed into the development of a public report later this year. We invite anyone interested to learn more about this emergent field of technology and give input about future directions and areas of challenge and opportunity.

The Federal Government also is working to leverage AI for public good and toward a more effective government. A new National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) Subcommittee on Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence will meet for the first time next week. This group will monitor state-of-the-art advances and technology milestones in artificial intelligence and machine learning within the Federal Government, in the private sector, and internationally; and help coordinate Federal activity in this space.

Broadly, between now and the end of the Administration, the NSTC group will work to increase the use of AI and machine learning to improve the delivery of government services. Such efforts may include empowering Federal departments and agencies to run pilot projects evaluating new AI-driven approaches and government investment in research on how to use AI to make government services more effective. Applications in AI to areas of government that are not traditionally technology-focused are especially significant; there is tremendous potential in AI-driven improvements to programs and delivery of services that help make everyday life better for Americans in areas related to urban systems and smart cities, mental and physical health, social welfare, criminal justice, the environment, and much more.

We look forward to engaging with the public about how best to harness the opportunities brought by artificial intelligence. Stay tuned for more information about the work we’re doing on this subject as it develops over the coming months.”

Ed Felten is a Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer.



Source: Robohub

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Started Today at 11:00:05 AM
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Tyler

Eureka! How to make discoveries at the speed of light in AI News

Eureka! How to make discoveries at the speed of light
2 May 2016, 12:00 am

                    The Roskilde music festival in Denmark is a huge logistical undertaking, attracting 130,000 visitors each year. Over eight days guests camp out and watch 170 live performances.

BBC News - TechnologyLink

Source: AI in the News

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Started Today at 05:00:25 AM
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Tyler

The Monospinner: world’s mechanically simplest controllable flying machine in Robotics News

The Monospinner: world’s mechanically simplest controllable flying machine
3 May 2016, 2:13 pm

The Monospinner in flight.Fig. 1. The Monospinner in flight. The Monospinner (Fig.1), developed at the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control at ETH Zurich, is the mechanically simplest, controllable, flying machine in existence. It has only one moving part (the rotating propeller), but can still fully control its position in space. The vehicle features no additional actuators or aerodynamic surfaces. 

Our research group aims at pushing the boundaries of flying machines by asking fundamental questions, such as “what is the minimum number of moving parts necessary for controlled flight?” All common flying vehicles require multiple moving parts: conventional quadrocopters, for example, have four moving parts (the four fixed-pitch propellers).  A helicopter’s main rotor requires a complicated swashplate mechanism with many moving parts, and a typical fixed-wing airplane requires one moving part for each of the ailerons, rudder, elevator, and main propulsion. Samara-type vehicles look like maple seeds (or samaras), and rotate while flying. These vehicles typically need two actuators to be . Some toys have only one moving part, but are not .

We set out to create a vehicle that has only a single moving part. The theoretical basis for this followed from previous work on quadrocopters, where we showed that a quadrocopter can maintain flight despite the complete loss of one, two, or three propellers. To do this, we redefined the definition of “to hover”: now the vehicle may rotate at a constant angular velocity as long as it remains approximately at the same point in space. Of course, the vehicle then has to be controlled near this hover solution, to allow it to track trajectories and reject disturbances.

This is tricky for the Monospinner, as it has only a single input (the thrust force) to control its states (compared to a conventional quadrocopter that has four inputs). We designed a cascaded controller (Fig. 2): the faster inner loop controls the thrust direction, while the slower outer loop controls the vehicle’s acceleration and thereby position. Roughly speaking, the single control input (the thrust magnitude) is decomposed into two parts, the average part of the thrust (calculated by the outer loop) which determines the acceleration of the Monospinner and the deviation from the average thrust (calculated from the inner loop) which controls its orientation.

Cascaded control structure: the outer position controller defines a desired acceleration, where the inner attitude controller defines the vehicle's attitude.Fig. 2. Cascaded control structure: the outer position controller defines a desired acceleration, where the inner attitude controller defines the vehicle’s attitude. After the theoretical analysis, we proceeded to build a vehicle. However, there are a lot of uncertainties in the real world: one example is that we do not have a good aerodynamic model of such a complex rotating object. In addition, there are uncertainties such as the mass distribution or the position of the vehicle’s center of mass. We set out to design something that would fly even if we did not know the parameters exactly. We evaluated different designs using Monte Carlo simulations, where we sample different perturbations from the above-mentioned uncertainties and use simulations to test whether our controller would still work. We did this until we found a configuration that works in most situations: the resulting Y-shaped vehicle is shown in Fig. 3 below.

Fig. 3. Monte Carlo simulation results, showing how likely a vehicle is to be controllable (the color scale indicates the likelihood of a crash) as a function of where the vehicle's electronics are placed. The vehicle’s approximate size and shape are based on existing vehicles. The vehicle has three main components, which are approximately equally massive: the battery, electronics, and the motor/propeller. By fixing the positions of the propeller and the battery as two vertices of an equilateral triangle, a Monte Carlo analysis was conducted for different positions of the electronics in the vicinity of the third triangle vertex.  The final electronics position was chosen as a compromise between low likelihood of failure (as determined by the Monte Carlo simulations) and other considerations (such as ease of mechanical construction). This location is plotted with a red dashed line.Fig. 3. Monte Carlo simulation results, showing how likely a vehicle is to be controllable (the color scale indicates the likelihood of a crash) as a function of where the vehicle’s electronics are placed. The vehicle’s approximate size and shape are based on existing vehicles.* The vehicle has three main components, which are approximately equally massive: the battery, electronics, and the motor/propeller. By fixing the positions of the propeller and the battery as two vertices of an equilateral triangle, a Monte Carlo analysis was conducted for different positions of the electronics in the vicinity of the third triangle vertex. The final electronics position was chosen as a compromise between low likelihood of failure (as determined by the Monte Carlo simulations) and other considerations (such as ease of mechanical construction). This location is plotted with a red dashed line. *Link to research

The control strategy only works near hover, where the vehicle spins about 4 revolutions per second. To get the vehicle near the operating angular velocity, we built a passive platform (Fig. 4 below), which has a vertically oriented bearing allowing the Monospinner to rotate freely. The rotation is achieved through the reaction torque of the propeller, and the thrust is slowly ramped up from zero. Once the vehicle is sufficiently near the hover angular velocity, the controller is switched on and the vehicle jumps off the platform. The platform ensures that the take-off condition is near the hover solution for each experiment.  Once we were confident that the vehicle would reliably work from such a controlled starting point, we pushed our luck, and we found out that the system is robust enough to recover after it is thrown into the air like a Frisbee ().

There are still open questions, which we will explore in future work: for example, we plan to refine the control strategy to allow the Monospinnner to recover from a larger range of initial conditions.

The Monospinner resting on the takeoff platform, which allows the vehicle to freely rotate about its axis of rotation, so that the vehicle can take off near its hover angular velocity and orientation. We have since shown that the Monospinner can also be hand-launched, by throwing it like a Frisbee.Fig. 4. The Monospinner resting on the takeoff platform, which allows the vehicle to freely rotate about its axis of rotation, so that the vehicle can take off near its hover angular velocity and orientation. We have since shown that the Monospinner can also be hand-launched, by throwing it like a Frisbee. If you liked this article, you may also be interested in:

See all the latest robotics news on Robohub, or sign up for our weekly newsletter.

Source: Robohub

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Started Today at 05:00:25 AM
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Claude

Happy May! in General Chat



Happy May!  :)

2 Comments | Started May 03, 2016, 08:43:26 PM
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Maviarab

Friday Funny in General Chat

Share your jokes here to bring joy to the world  :)

1495 Comments | Started February 13, 2009, 01:52:35 PM
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Carl2

Chatbot designer pro in General AI Discussion

  I found this on the web while searching for learning chatbots.  http://janbogaerts.name/index.php/downloads/ , It was released Dec. 15, 2011 so it should be up to date.  Just got the homwpage, http://janbogaerts.name/ , it uses a neural network which I read about some time ago.  There are two versions, the Chatbot designer basic and the chatbot designer pro.  I've got the pro version and have been playing with it to familarize myself with it. He has quite alot of doumentation about it and quite a few video's to help with using it.  
Carl2

14 Comments | Started January 03, 2012, 01:59:46 PM
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paphus

Open Bot Directory and linking API in General Chatbots and Software

We just finished an article for our blog on our open bot directory and linking API for Bot Libre.

Our bot browse directory is not just for bots created on our site, but for any type of bot created anywhere. Chat bots, virtual agents, twitterbots, facebots, slackbots, telegrambots, any type of bots.

You can link the bots, tag and categories them, and let users rate and thumbs up them.

If your bot has a web API, we also have a linking API that lets users chat with the bot directly on our website, apps, and through our open source SDKs. You can use our avatars, and tts, and your bot can take part in Chat Bot Wars.

http://www.botlibre.com/forum-post?id=12623724

15 Comments | Started April 26, 2016, 06:50:42 PM
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Tyler

Researchers reveal major security flaws in Samsung's SmartThings system in AI News

Researchers reveal major security flaws in Samsung's SmartThings system
2 May 2016, 12:00 am

                    Hackers can create new PIN code by sending users malicious link in app Injected erroneous events used to trick devices to turn on or shut down Transforming a home into an 'intelligent agent' allows users to monitor, control and secure it via apps and a smartphone. But new findings suggest these systems also give hackers the tools needed to operate smart locks, change access codes and set off Wi-Fi enabled smoke detectors.

Daily Mail - Sciencetech (UK)Link

Source: AI in the News

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Started May 03, 2016, 11:00:41 PM
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Tyler

Robohub Digest 04/16: FAA reauthorization, drone ships and US National Robotics Week in Robotics News

Robohub Digest 04/16: FAA reauthorization, drone ships and US National Robotics Week
3 May 2016, 12:35 pm

digest_16-04

A quick, hassle-free way to stay on top of robotics news, our robotics digest is released on the first Monday of every month. Sign up to get it in your inbox.

Spotlight: US National Robotics Week

Source: nationalroboticsweek.orgSource: nationalroboticsweek.org April was a big month for robotics in the US as those working in the field hosted the seventh annual National Robotics Week, with numerous robotics activities, talks and workshops for anyone with an interest in robotics. The aim of Robotics Week is to engage and inspire people at a time when the field is moving forward so quickly that many struggle to keep up. For kids in particular the different activities offer a rare insight into what robotics is all about – and how much fun it can be.

Events took place across the country and one group in California, Robot Garden, stood out as the group that hosted the most activities, ranging from a Lego Robotics Club to a robot swap event. And don’t worry if you missed it – Robot Garden hosts events all year round, just check out their website.

April’s Fools’ Day robot fun

wonderpaw-april-fools

In many countries 1 April is known as April Fools’ Day – a day you get creative and think of ways to fool those around you with made-up stories and practical jokes. The robotics community joined in the fun once again this year with a number of crazy ideas, including: robotic note takers, remote pizza slicers, and levitating speakers. Robohub summarised some of the best robotics-related April Fools’ Day jokes here. And don’t worry if you fell prey to any of those jokes – with the astonishing advances being made in robotics every day, it can be difficult to distinguish fact from fiction.

Showcasing Industry 4.0

Internet_of_Things_Smart_phone_IoT_conveyor_Belt_industry_factory

People may think the idea of multi-purpose robotic arms or cells – much discussed in industry circles – is still more fiction than fact. But in Belgium a collective centre for technology industry called Sirris is now showcasing what industry 4.0 could look like. Dutch-German partnership, SInBot, have developed an operating system that will allow low cost, small-scale production with industrial robots. Smart factories are certainly not just fiction any more! No wonder then that the International Federation for Robotics reported that industrial robot sales were higher than ever in 2015.

Investments, Acquisitions, Mergers

Dmitry Grishin at the Skolkovo Robotics conference in Russia.Dmitry Grishin at the Skolkovo Robotics conference in Russia. Competition is heating up for venture capital with Grishin Robotics announcing a new $100 million fund open to hardware and software companies to support the Hardware Revolution, expanding their geographical focus to include Europe. Meanwhile San Francisco based startup Dispatch secured $2 million to build a fleet of autonomous delivery vehicles.

But it’s not just venture capital investments that fuel the interest and excitement in new technologies – acquisitions and mergers can have a similar effect. GM’s acquisition of Cruise Automation has led to a renewed interest in kits for self-driving cars – essentially kits that allow conversion of normal cars into (more) autonomous ones. And Amazon’s acquisition of Kiva in 2012 left a void that paved the way for several smaller companies to develop novel warehouse robotic systems, many of which were showcased this April at MODEX 2016.

Drones vs. FAA

Register_Now_Drone_FAA_UAV_UAS

While researchers and industry are excited about new applications for robotics, lawmakers are thinking about how these applications should be regulated. The best example for this is the regulation of drones, a hot topic for many months (or possibly years) and has been making headlines once again in April. This is because the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), responsible for the regulation of drones at a national level, has to be (re-)authorized every few years – a process happening right now.

Two of the major bills being debated by US Congress in relation to FAA authorization are focused on drones that could have a profound effect on the future of the US drone industry. Some are worried that the wording in the bills could curtail local drone laws and law enforcement in relation to drones, something lawmakers are seeking to change before the bill is passed. While Congress continues to deliberate, drones are still being used around the globe for a variety of tasks.

A view from above

2016_04_11_080

It has only been five years since the devastating earthquake off the east coast of Japan that caused a tsunami and massive destruction March 2011, and on 16 April 2016 the earth in Kumamoto and Ōita Prefectures shook again. Soon after it happened, drones were used to assess the aftermath of this quake, helping to map the destruction and devastation caused.

And mapping the impact of natural disasters is not the only way in which drones may monitor environments – they’ve also been used in bio-conservation to help monitor wildlife, as is the case in the Bornean jungle where Dirk Gorissen is tracking orangutans with python and react.js.

Drone racing

DJI_Phantom_Drone

With the popularity of drones ever increasing, it’s no wonder that racing drones against one another is a new ‘sport’ that’s moving from backyards, fields, and abandoned buildings to mainstream media – more precisely to ESPN. This upcoming August, ESPN will broadcast the US National Drone Racing Championships online. And who knows – drone racing may soon be on our TV’s soon enough.

Robots take to the high seas

Clownfish BIVClownfish BIV But robots are not just conquering the air(waves) – they’re also taking to the seas. This month DARPA celebrated the naming of their remote controlled submarine hunting vessel, Sea Hunter. The unmanned ship can track and follow submarines and may spell a new era for naval seafaring. But DARPA weren’t the only ones celebrating in April as SpaceX successfully landed their Falcon 9 rocket on their drone ship off the Florida coast for the first time. And where SpaceX’s drone ship leads, commercial shipping might soon follow – at least according to Oskar Levander, head of innovation for Rolls Royce’s marine unit, who is expecting commercial drone ships to sail the seas in the not too distant future.

Robots are not just conquering the sea’s surface. In an effort to support conservation for example, South African inventor Simeon Pieterkosky developed a bio-inspired robotic fish that can monitor water quality, clean up debris, and save fish from illegal fishing nets – fully immersible and mainly under water, of course.

Autonomous cars on public roads

Platooning. Photo: Dan BomanPlatooning. Photo: Dan Boman Unmanned vehicles at sea and on land are still somewhat of a rarity at the moment, so in a bid to speed up the introduction of autonomous truck platoons in Europe, Daimler let three of its autonomous trucks loose on German and Dutch roads as part of the European Truck Platooning Challenge. The trucks drove from Stuttgart to Rotterdam using the company’s Connected Highway Pilot system and reached their destination without incident on 7 April.

While the successful completion of this challenge may have been great for Daimler, it’s likely that the appearance of fully autonomous cars on our roads are still years away. In the US, car manufacturers have asked the government to slow down the introduction of such vehicles, and there are practical challenges to consider, such as insurance covers and city infrastructure, as SPARC explained on Robohub.

3-D printing blowing our minds

Source: The Next Rembrandt/YouTubeSource: The Next Rembrandt/YouTube And finally: We’ve known for a while that the possibilities of 3D printing are seemingly endless – April astonished us once again with the limitless imagination using this technology. Researchers at MIT’s CSAIL have developed a way to print solid and liquid materials simultaneously, allowing them to produce dynamic robots in one step, abolishing the need for assembly and paving the way for rapid production of fully functional robots.

Lastly, a team at the Smithsonian used a mixture of 3D printing, scanning, and AI to create a new Rembrandt-style painting. We can’t wait to see what this technology, and the people behind it, will create next!

Upcoming events

International Collaborative Robots Workshop (RIA ICRW 2016): 3-4 May, Hynes Convention Center in Boston, MA.

IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA 2016): 16-21 May, Stockholm, Sweden

International Conference on Real-time Computing and Robotics (RCAR 2016): 6-9 June, Angkor Wat, Cambodia

International Conference on Unmanned Aircraft Systems, (ICUAS 2016): 7-10 June, Arlington, VA, USA

Automatica: 21-24 June,  Messe München, Germany

IEEE International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (BioRob 2016): 26-29 June, University Town, Singapore

9th IFAC Symposium on Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles (IAV 2016): 29 June – 1 July, Messe Leipzig, Germany

Source: Robohub

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Started May 03, 2016, 11:00:41 PM
Botwiki.org Monthly Bot Challenge

Botwiki.org Monthly Bot Challenge in Websites

Botwiki.org is a site for showcasing friendly, useful, artistic online bots, and our Monthly Bot Challenge is a recurring community event dedicated to making these kinds of bots.

Feb 25, 2016, 19:46:54 pm
From Movies to Reality: How Robots Are Revolutionizing Our World

From Movies to Reality: How Robots Are Revolutionizing Our World in Articles

Robots were once upon a time just a work of human imagination. Found only in books and movies, not once did we think a time would come where we would be able to interact with robots in real world. Eventually, in fact rapidly, the innovations we only dreamt of are now becoming a reality. Quoting the great Stephen Hawking "This is a glorious time to be alive for scientists". It is indeed the best time for the technology has become more and more sophisticated that its growing power might even endanger humanity.

Jan 26, 2016, 10:12:00 am
Uncanny

Uncanny in Robots in Movies

Uncanny is a 2015 American science fiction film directed by Matthew Leutwyler and based on a screenplay by Shahin Chandrasoma. It is about the world's first "perfect" artificial intelligence (David Clayton Rogers) that begins to exhibit startling and unnerving emergent behavior when a reporter (Lucy Griffiths) begins a relationship with the scientist (Mark Webber) who created it.

Jan 20, 2016, 13:09:41 pm
AI Virtual Pets

AI Virtual Pets in Other

Artificial life also called Alife is simply the simulation of any aspect of life, as through computers, robotics, or biochemistry. (taken from the Free dictionary)This site focus's on the software aspect of it.

Oct 03, 2015, 09:21:09 am
Why did HAL sing ‘Daisy’?

Why did HAL sing ‘Daisy’? in Articles

...a burning question posed by most people who have watched or read “2001: A Space Odyssey”: that is, why does the computer HAL-9000 sing the song ‘Daisy Bell’ as the astronaut Dave Bowman takes him apart?

Sep 04, 2015, 09:28:55 am
Humans

Humans in Robots on TV

Humans is a British-American science fiction television series. Written by the British team Sam Vincent and Jonathan Brackley, based on the award-winning Swedish science fiction drama Real Humans, the series explores the emotional impact of the blurring of the lines between humans and machines.

Aug 28, 2015, 09:13:37 am
Virtual Talk

Virtual Talk in Chatbots - English

[iTunes app] Virtual Talk is a AI chatting app that makes you talk with whomever you want. It remembers what you say and learns new dialogs. This app is one of the smartest chatbots in the world.

Aug 17, 2015, 13:33:09 pm
Robot Overlords

Robot Overlords in Robots in Movies

Not long after the invasion and occupation of Earth by a race of powerful robots wanting human knowledge and ingenuity, humans are confined to their homes. Leaving without permission would be to risk their lives. Monitored by the electronic implants in their necks, the robot sentries are able to track the movements of humans in order to control them. And if any person comes out of their home, they are given warnings by the robot sentries to get inside their home. If they do not comply, they are shot immediately.

Long article on the making of here...

Aug 15, 2015, 14:42:25 pm
Zerfoly

Zerfoly in Chatbots - English

Zerfoly is a chatbot platform that makes it possible to create imaginary persons (chatbots) and teach them to talk to each other.

You will be able to let loose your creativity and imagination. Build persons, by writing interactive dialogues. The persons you create will gradually become individuals with unique personalities. One of the persons could bear your name and learn to talk like you; your alter ego. Another way of using Zerfoly is as an interactive diary.

Aug 09, 2015, 11:06:42 am
Eva

Eva in Robots in Movies

This Spanish film is set in 2041, in the time when humans live along with machines. Álex (Daniel Brühl), a renowned cybernetic engineer, returns to Santa Irene to carry out a very specific mission for the Robotic Faculty — to create a child robot. During his ten–year absence, life has moved on for his brother David (Alberto Ammann) and for Lana (Marta Etura), who married David after Álex's departure. Álex's routine is altered in an unexpected ways by Eva (Claudia Vega), Lana and David's charismatic daughter. She and Álex have a special connection from the moment they meet. They set out on a journey together, which will bring them to a revelatory end. ~Wikipedia

Apr 03, 2014, 11:01:33 am